Spring Cleaning Allows Homeowners to Declutter Making It Easier to Age in Place

Spring is my favorite time of year.  It is a time for new beginnings, a time for us to declutter, and a time for us to start thinking about the future.  Although there are many renovations that can be done to a home to make it safer to stay in as we age it is important to start the process somewhere.  Spring cleaning is the perfect time to begin the process and thinking about making your home safer to grow old in.  The warmer weather makes it the perfect time to organize, arrange, and renovate the space for your future.

Accidental falls are the number one injury faced by aging homeowners.   Falls that occur because of environmental factors are easily avoided when proper precautions are taken.  The chores that we can accomplish on our own around our homes safely decreases significantly as our physical and cognitive abilities lessen.  These changes happen naturally as we age.  Even the most independent adults will slowly start to need assistance around the home in order to safely age in place.  Activities such as washing dishes, doing laundry, and self-care are things that older individuals are able to do while living on their own however, more advanced chores will require outside support.

Certain issues plague us as we age.  Not only do we become weaker and have less energy, our vision and memory start to fail.  As these more advanced impairments occur our needs to continue living in our homes will change.  While you are spring cleaning it is crucial to begin to think about the factors that will change and limit you down the road.  This is a perfect time to donate excess furniture and knick-knack items that have been collected.  Increasing open space by removing the excess allows for better mobility and decreases the number of tripping hazards. 

Eliminating items from your home can be difficult.  It is important to keep in mind throughout the process that not everything needs to be gotten rid of immediately.  It is a process that will occur over the course of time while you wish to remain in your home and living independently.  For now, start the process by donating, selling, gifting, or discarding those items you are sure of.  If you no longer have a twin sized bed you no longer have a need for twin sized sheets.  Start simple this spring. 

The time to start thinking about your future starts today.  Most of us wish to stay in our homes as long as we can safely do so.  With that in mind future renovations should be completed in a manner that considers aging.  Age in place contractors specialize in creating spaces that are safe for older homeowners discreetly.  Renovations that consider aging in place are most often hardly recognizable.  Some of which include:

  • Custom closets that add storage and organization without the need to reach above your head
  • Shelving for the kitchen & bath that easily slide in and out
  • Increased lighting fixtures throughout the home – lamps are discouraged as they present a tripping hazard
  • Hardwood flooring, low piled carpet, and slip-resistant flooring – throw rugs should be removed from the home
  • Levered handles for doors, faucets, and cabinetry

It is important to start somewhere when you know that your desire is to live within your own home as you age.  Taking it one step at a time makes the process as a whole easier to handle both emotionally and physically.

Glen Miller the Home Doctor is a licensed general contractor servicing Livingston County and the surrounding areas.  Glen offers a wide range of services including home maintenance plans, age in place remodeling, kitchen and bathroom remodeling, finished basements, and hardwood floor refinishing.  More information can be found online at https://www.glenmillerthehomedoctor.com/.

These Are the Most Expensive Fails in DIY Home Improvement

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Many thrifty homeowners would rather save a few bucks by taking on upgrades themselves (after a few hours binge-watching HGTV and YouTube tutorials, of course) than by calling in the professionals to install new floors or retile the bathroom. Paying the pros is basically throwing money away, right?

If done right, going DIY to fix up a property can lead to some hefty savings. But DIY fails can cost folks big time, according to a recent report from Porch, an online network that connects folks with home improvement professionals.To come up with its results, Porch surveyed nearly 1,200 folks who had completed a home improvement project within the last year.

It turns out the average DIY mistake can cost folks $310 to make right.

“People often take on repairs themselves in an effort to save money, but often can end [up] spending more,” says Porch’s spokesperson, Amanda Woolley. “People are also underestimating the time and emotional toll of these projects.”

So which DIY home improvement flop can set homeowners back the most? Installing flooring wrong costs folks an added $829, bringing the total bill to an average $1,540. That’s got to hurt. Redoing the floors also added an average of 13.8 extra hours of work.

“Jobs like flooring have a high material cost, so errors add [up] very quickly,” says Woolley. Hey, hardwood boards don’t come cheap.

The second most expensive mistake was in exterior paint jobs, which can add $447 to the tab. This was followed by replacing an electrical outlet wrong, an average $445 blunder; installing a ceiling fan incorrectly, at $306; and messing up the electrical wiring, at $255.

Slip-ups can take an emotional toll as well as a financial one. About 45.8% of do-it-yourselfers surveyed who made a mistake fought with their partner during the project, compared with 21.6% of the folks who did everything correctly.

Couples were most likely to fight with one another over electrical wiring or rewiring projects, 43.6% of survey respondents reported. Hanging or patching drywall came in second for sparking domestic strife, at 41.7%; followed by replacing an electrical outlet, at 39.1%; installing a ceiling fan, at 38.2%; and an exterior paint job, at 32.7%.

“These projects can definitely test relationships—whether they are worried about their partner’s safety or arguing about the materials,” says Woolley. “People need to [be] honest about their skill set and do a very close audit of their time versus money tolerance.”

“Is it worth the cost savings for the time and effort you’ll need to put into the job?” she continues. “If not, it might be worth hiring a professional.

Original Source: https://www.realtor.com/news/trends/how-much-diy-home-improvement-fails-cost/

Original Date: Mar 27 2019

Written BY: Clare Trapasso