The Correct Use of Lighting in Your Home Improvements

In order to bring your remodeling projects to a whole new level consider the lighting in the space. In order to truly understand how the lighting in a room can spice up any renovation it is important to know what types of lighting is available and the best ratio of light to use within the space. To help we have created a list of different lighting options available to choose from.

Options in Lighting

Lighting can be used in a number of ways.  More often than not layered lighting is the best option to really boost your rooms appeal. When renovating the space consider how the three options below work together to not only provide functionality but also style, and beauty. Ambient Lighting: General lighting is considered ambient lighting and is used to create overall illumination within your renovation. Ambient lighting is the lighting is the usable lighting in the space.  It provides the brightness that is needed in the room to proceed with the tasks that are done within the space.More often than not your renovations will include ambient lighting.  This includes lighting that comes from the ceiling from ceiling mounted lights, recessed lighting, track lights, and chandeliers. Task Lighting: As the name applies, task lighting is in place to make every day tasks easier.  Task lighting provides a small beam of targeted light for activities like working, cooking, reading, getting ready and more.  Some examples of task lighting are floor lamps, reading lamps, under-cabinet lighting, stove lighting and more.  Task lighting take away the imperfections such as glare and shadow. Accent Lighting: Much like you add a hat and scarf to your coat or earring to an outfit, accent lighting is used to add flair to your room. It adds a focal point within your room. Most accent lighting fixtures provide at least three more times the light then ambient light does.  If you have incredibly high ceilings and you want to accentuate the height add an accent light to the ceiling.  If you have a picture on the wall that you want to be the main focus of the room, try adding in sconces that project lighting on to the pieces.

Plan for Lighting in Your Renovation

As you are planning for your remodel clarify your goals for the space and how the lighting needs to be utilized in the space.  What will you be doing in the space?  If you are renovating a kitchen are you looking to do more than cook and eat? Often times extra lighting is needed above an island area to illuminate the space for working or studying. Consider adjustable lighting as well in areas like a dining room so that the mood of the room can be changed depending on the situation. Your lighting should also take into consideration the style of your renovation.  Modern lighting options don’t fit in aesthetically with country chic.  When choosing lighting consider the different aspects of the room remodel you want to coordinate with. Next it is important to consider how much lighting you actually want and need.  What is the right amount of lighting to make your renovation usable as it is intended too?  Having too little lighting in a space may make the remodel useless which is the last thing you want for your new space.  Consider the size of the space.  A good calculation to make is that 40 lumens are needs per foot of room space.  A 600 square foot room would need 24,000 lumens, 600 square foot x 40. Build a plan for your room remodeling lighting elements that begins with a central source of ambient lighting.  You can build onto the lighting in the space from there.  Task lighting is usually the next element that contractors consider. Do you need some glare free work space above the counters to allow you to easily measure ingredients?  Do you need additional lighting over a kitchen island where you will be prepping meals or bake goods?  Lastly, choose one interesting feature in the renovation that you want to bring attention to.  Add in an accent feature to highlight the feature.  If you have had an amazing arched entry add you may want to include wall sconces that shine light upward on each side of the entry to highlight the arch. It is also important to choose the right type of light bulb for each type of lighting feature.  Will you be using all incandescent lights?  Do you prefer LED bulbs?  Are you okay with a combination of both?  Most ambient lighting will use incandescent light bulbs as they provide a warm glow.  LED lights are best used in task lighting where the brightness of the bulb helps to see what you are working on better. Glen Miller the Home Doctor is a licensed general contractor servicing Livingston County and the surrounding areas.  Glen offers a wide range of services including home maintenance plans, age in place remodeling, kitchen and bathroom remodeling, finished basements, and hardwood floor refinishing.  More information can be found online at https://www.glenmillerthehomedoctor.com/

‘The Best Home Improvement Advice I Ever Heard’

If you’re a homeowner, you’ve probably heard and read plenty of home improvement advice. It just kind of comes with the territory, right? In fact, the second you sign the mortgage, your fellow homeowners will welcome you to the club with tons of tips about fixing up your humble abode—whether you welcome their help or not.

Some of the advice you’ll receive should probably be taken with a smile and a nod … and then immediately disregarded. But every now and then, you’ll hear a piece of advice that’s so full of wisdom, it will stick with you for years to come. Maybe you’ll even pass it on to everyone else!

We asked homeowners and real estate experts about the best home improvement advice they’ve ever heard. So take out your notebook and jot these gems down (or, you know, just bookmark this page). You’re going to want to remember these later.

Paint can solve a plethora of problems

“The absolute best home improvement advice I ever received was one word, and it [was] something of a mantra for my father: ‘Paint.’ Style looking dated? Paint. Want to brighten up a room? Paint. Need to enhance curb appeal? Paint—even if it’s just the front door.

“But my dad also emphasized it was about more than aesthetics. Air getting in through a crack? Caulk it, then paint it. Eaves or fascia rotting? Replace, reseal, paint. Metal patio furniture rusting? Coat it with a rust-prohibiting primer, then keep it painted. The fastest, easiest, and most straightforward answer for both immediate home improvement and long-term care? Paint. This advice has never steered me wrong.” —Monica Eaton-Cardone, homeowner in Clearwater, FL

Fix what you can before you move in

“Before [I moved] into my first home last summer, my mom advised me to fix whatever we could prior to moving in. … And I’m so glad we did, because little projects I saved for after the move, like painting the inside of closet doors, are yet to be complete. Once your furniture and clothes are moved in, it’s just so much harder to work around all this stuff.” —Rebecca Graham, homeowner in Pleasant Grove, UT

Planning a huge renovation? Wait awhile

“If you can, live in a home for a while before renovating. You will be much more thoughtful about how you utilize the space, problems that need to be solved, and new additions you would like to have. This is especially true for high-use locations, such as kitchens, bathrooms, and entrances, which can all be costly to renovate.” —Joan Kagan, real estate agent at Triplemint, New York, NY

Renovate with the next buyer in mind

“I’ve moved a lot and purchased homes in a few different states, and the best home improvement advice I ever received was: ‘Don’t think of what you want, think about what the next owner will want.’ When renovating, keeping this wise advice in mind has helped me have every house I’ve ever tried to sell under contract within a week of listing.” —Julie Gurner, homeowner in Lancaster, PA

Do improvements long before you sell

“Make and enjoy home improvements for yourself—what’s the point of waiting until you’re ready to sell your property?” —Barbara Bowers, homeowner and real estate agent in Key West, FL

Cheaper isn’t always better

“‘Cheap is often expensive.’ This proved to be painfully true when we hired a painter to paint our apartment while we were out of town. We got a referral for the guy, who seemed to do a great job for a friend and … we found his fee attractive. Fast-forward a week, when we came back to a filthy apartment that was half-done, with paint everywhere—on the sofa, our floors, and even on newly painted areas! We wound up dealing with more stress than it was worth.” —Brenda Della Casa, homeowner in London

There are some things you just can’t DIY

“My dad told me, ‘You can do anything yourself, except foundation, electrical, or plumbing.'” —Kirsten Selvage, homeowner in Ontario, Canada

Pretty stupid is not pretty

“Don’t forget function. ‘Pretty stupid is not pretty!’ I’ve shared that quote with many clients over the years; never allow aesthetics to trump function in your design. A common example we see all the time is beautiful kitchens with inadequate counter space or cabinets that can’t open when appliances/other cabinets are being used.” —Katherine Scarim, owner of Island Bridge Realty, Jupiter, FL

Do it right the first time

“It’s cheaper to do it right than it is to do it over.” —Jim Molinelli, architect in Columbia, MD

Not everything goes as planned

“Every project costs twice as much and takes twice as long as you think.” —Lori Smith, homeowner in Pataskala, OH

Original Source: https://www.realtor.com/advice/home-improvement/best-home-improvement-advice-ever-heard/

Written By: Whitney Coy

Published Date: Nov 28, 2018